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Archive for May, 2008

Fernando F&%^$*?!!! Tatis

May 29, 2008 Comments off

Fernando Tatis is trying to get his place back in the majors:

For the second straight night, the Mets trotted out their bizarre good-luck charm in the person of public relations guru Jay Horwitz, who was once again clad in a loud orange jacket that even TBS’ Craig Sager would have left on the rack.

It worked, though, as Fernando Tatis’ one-out, two-run double in the 12th inning gave the Mets a 7-6 win over the Marlins last night at Shea Stadium. The Mets had tied it on Endy Chavez’s pinch home run in the ninth.

Fernando Tatis

So you know, I was following the game online and while D was watching Top Chef, I shouted “holy s**t! Fernando f****** Tatis just drove home the winning runs!” It’s a start, a come from behind homer by Endy Chavez of all people in the ninth to tie, then a run given up by Met pitcher Duaner Sanchez in the top of the 12th, and then 2 runs (Wright and Beltran were on base) in the bottom of the twelfth to beat the Marlins.

More game description from Mets Geek.

Categories: baseball, Mets, Sports

Sports Links, 05.27.08

May 27, 2008 Comments off

Well, it’s about sports, kinda: Obama’s right hand man on the campaign trail is none other than former Duke guard/ forward Reggie Love. The New York Times loves the story, NY Mag wants him to run for president in the future (Shane Battier will get there first), and Gawker compares him very favorably to John Kerry’s right hand man, who never introduced Kerry to Jay-Z’s music. Nice place to continue your post-sport career.

- Your Orlando Pre NBA Draft Camp list. I hope they have a lot of bunks because that’s a lot of fellas.

- Mike Jarvis, former St. John’s coach often likened to the devil for his improper payments and laxness in recruiting for the Red Storm, will be coaching at Florida Atlantic.

- The Mets are so bad that MetsGeek (one of my favorite Met blogs) has changed its name to “RaysGeek.” THAT, I think, is too far.

- Related: Gary Carter is a full bushel bag of dicks for openly reaching out to the Mets when he heard that Willie Randolph’s job was in might be jeopardy (and kudos for Keith Hernandez for calling him out on air). And it might be that our 2008 iteration of the Mets is just mediocre, not the most abysmal chunk of useless turdblossom to grace the National League.

- Also: new player Nick Evans has my favorite number, #6. It’s been worn by 35 Mets and this is the second wearer this season. Oh, Timoniel Perez, why couldn’t you have been better.

- Also: Luis Castillo isn’t very good. I really hated that re-signing. And Jose Valentin might be on his way back. He might actually be an improvement over Castillo (FAMOUS LAST WORDS).

Memorial Day + Emmanuelle Chriqui

May 23, 2008 Comments off

Emmanuelle Chriqui from GQIt’s quiet in the sport world besides:

- the Willie Randolph Death Watch,

- players still transferring,

- pictures of your possible #1 and #2 picks,

- wondering how the Knicks can upgrade their point guard situation from Marbury,

- a review of this winter’s baseball trades,

- a Dana O’Neil article on how next year’s list of one-and-done college players should be much shorter, and tendency to have players rated and signed before/ early in high school (O’Neil is becoming my new favorite female sports writer now that Lisa Olson’s been chopped up by Lupica and has not yet resurfaced)…

But then I came across this photo gallery of Emmanuelle Chriqui and I realized the following. Memorial Day is a day made to celebrate and memorialize military sacrifice, to think about what a good life we lead because of those who came before us, and it is a day to shirk work and surf the internet more than usual. Which, I suppose, is a lot.

So enjoy! Limited posting over the weekend, time for a wedding and a barbecue.

Devil Rays, wtf.

May 23, 2008 Comments off

What is going on in baseball that has the Devil Rays near first place??

Hat tip to the Big Lead and A Large Regular, because I sure don’t check on Sports Illustrated’s covers.

Categories: baseball, funny, Sports

MLB Teams Select Surviving Negro Leaguers at 2008 Draft

May 22, 2008 1 comment

Hat tip to Doc Manhattan for cluing me in to this announcement from the MLB by way of AOL Sports Blogs:

As part of its 2008 First-Year Player Draft next month, Major League Baseball will hold a ceremonial selection of players from the Negro Leagues. Participation in the draft is voluntary, but most of the 30 clubs are expected to take part as baseball continues its efforts to keep alive the history of the Negro Leagues.

The ceremonial event will be streamed live by BaseballChannel.TV at 1 p.m. ET, directly preceding the start of the 2008 First-Year Player Draft at 2 p.m. ET. Both events will take place at The Milk House at Disney’s Wide World of Sports complex in Orlando, Fla. Fans are encouraged to attend and admission is free, with seating available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Each team will compensate the player it selects with a stipend, Solomon said. Major League Baseball will pick up the travel expenses for each player (and a companion) to the Draft headquarters in Orlando.

OHHkay. Issues:

Satchel Paige- it’s nice to honor the Negro Leaguers, but dang, this is a publicity stunt. Why not just give them a stipend from MLB itself? Is this stipend for the rest of their lives?

- a ceremonial selection? why allocate these players, well past their time and not in line for contracts, to teams? So the team has a show pony for an African American history day? I guess there is little backbreaking labor, but still… doesn’t this whole plan sound silly? Or kind of like a slave auction? MLB gets the players and brings them to market… the teams give them a little money… I kid. Somewhat. No, not that much. Any player draft has a level of servitude, but the conditions are light years better.

- what is BaseballChannel.tv? That’s not on cable it’s… online. So this is a poor publicity stunt to boot.

I wouldn’t even have gone through all of this; I would have MLB set up a fund and hook these guys up with a stipend. And then I’d look to send some of the remaining (and able-bodied and able-minded) folks into the broadcast booth during local weekend games and a few national games to chat for a few innings about their experience. I would also have bobblehead days (or some other giveaway) conceived around the play of some the great African-American ballplayers – such as Satchel Paige and Cool Papa Bell, Josh Gibson and Larry Doby. Educate the kids, MLB!

Categories: baseball, race, Sports Tags:

Bryant Bulldogs: Jumping to D-I

May 22, 2008 7 comments

Bryant Bulldogs logoI’ve never heard of Bryant University in Rhode Island. I don’t even know where Smithfield, RI is. But the Bryant University Bulldogs are going to move up from Division II to Division I. Their basketball team will play in the Northeast Conference (NEC) and will play at U Conn (of course), Iowa, Rutgers, Maryland, against Providence College and Brown University, and in tournaments at Columbia and Ohio University. They’ll play only 9 of their 29 games at home.

They’ll be the new NJIT! If you are out there and have a list of other teams that are joining Division I let me know. I know the money is good up in D-I, but some teams really have to think about dropping back to the lower levels, or going Division III. I don’t see many more fans at a low level NEC D-I game than I did during a good game at the old WUniversity. And funding D-I sports has got to be a huge money-suck. Does playing in a low-level D-I conference bring a school that much notoriety?

Open Letter to Mets Manager Willie Randolph

May 21, 2008 Comments off

Dear Willie:

Oh no, no, no. Don’t get all fiery in an interview and bring up the “r” word. I mean “race,” not, “Reyes.” Aren’t you from New York? Don’t you know that the vocal fans and the news media love to jump on a flashpoint topic, and race is one of the biggest that we have? Don’t you know NYC is a city of loudmouths and people who feel that they’ve been wronged, people who feel that they are done dirty when they perceive another group of people receiving some kind of slight compensatory advantage, people who take it out wherever they can? Willie celebrationDon’t set those people off with talk about race, man!

I understand your need to defend your managerial style; certainly, you keep things more behind closed doors than some other guys. And I know the media and cameras love to see a demonstrative Larry Bowa-type coach. Well, I think those guys are loudmouths and may not be introspective enough, and that’s not the best way to lead. I agree with that.

But, from the Jersey Record:

“I’m as animated and as demonstrative and as involved and as intense as any manager in baseball.”

Randolph excluded Ozzie Guillen from the conversation, but wanted to know why the traits often admired in the calm, cool and collected likes of Joe Torre are portrayed as flaws in Torre’s former third base coach.

“Is it racial?” Randolph asked. “Huh? It smells a little bit.”

Asked directly if he believes black managers are held to different standards than their white counterparts, Randolph said: “I don’t know how to put my finger on it, but I think there’s something there. Herman Edwards did pretty well here and he won a couple of playoff [games], and they were pretty hard on Herm. Isiah [Thomas] didn’t do a great job, but they beat up Isiah pretty good. … I don’t know if people are used to a certain figurehead. There’s something weird about it.

Means that you used the “r” word, and the cat just won’t go back into the bag unless you win and win a lot. You can insult women in this day and age, you can use gay slurs, but do not reference your being black by calling something racial.

The loud voices in the media might listen to you for a hot second, but the fans – mostly white and very sensitive to anything that sounds like whining, and averse to being forced to feel guilty (or, you know, think about their actions and perceptions) – hate to hear a black person (especially) talk of race. It flies in the face of the legislation that removes legally sanctioned racism. It reminds them of years of being made to feel bad about inequality when they’re just trying to live their lives on equal economic + opportunity footing. It reminds them of “race hustlers,” whatever those are; and it makes them say things like “Willie’s using the race card” (Which isn’t a trump card at all). Or it will make those fans call you a racist, for the use of the single word. They’ll reference Al Sharpton and they’ll say they’re not racist but their anger at the “controversy” hints otherwise.

- See?
See?
– Well this one isn’t so – nope, see?
– Hey, these are relatively intelligent comments! Read the article.
See?

It’s too powerful a “weapon,” this word, “racism.” It no longer makes people think, it makes folks react and attack. And if your comments, like any other comments or defenses of your record, were meant to inform, illuminate, and get mofos off of your back, that just undid any effect they would have. Deaf ears greet any illuminations you might give to the media.

There’s a whole swath of black folks who know that commenting on race is going to obscure their message. And the important things is to be successful around those issues, especially when put in a position to do something favorable, something positive. The more success black people enjoy, the more normal it will be to have black managers (which isn’t abnormal), black top executives (somewhat irregular), or black presidents (absolutely abnormal).

And it’s not that Obama, for example, is ignoring race issues, or has solved the problem of how to talk about race. I bet Barack and Michelle talk about racism at dinner or on the phone, the subtle kinds that always sets the nation’s punditry into a tizzy and the reactionaries into a lather. It’s out there.

But talking about it is like making resolutions to sue OPEC to release more oil; it’s not gonna do a hot damned thing. Let others talk about race; be subtle in how you address indignity. Talking about it obscures what you’re trying to say and while I’d love for people to calmly talk about racial issues and understand the premises of why some people see racial bias and others don’t… it’s not happening this month.

The national dialogue is in a funny place about race, where if the topic/ referred situation is not overt, the word alone brings the nuts out of their corners to brawl; so many people think we’re really over racism, or “post-racial.”

As for the comments themselves… dude. Really? You’re complaining about how SNY portrays you on Mets’ broadcasts? Really? If you’re concerned, then make a little more show. Even Art Howe sometimes acted like he knew how to get angry. You have to play the game. And the current results, Willie, are not very good. You have to bunker down and try to make moves. And when you deflect, don’t use the “they don’t show me showing emotion” excuse.

Dude. Come on. That was weak and admittedly, actually paranoid. You can’t be worried about who likes you. You’ve got to lead your club. Tell the media the things you’re doing, but don’t talk about your “feelings,” man, that only opens you up to get hurt. And likening yourself to Herm Edwards, whose last teams were inconsistent, and then to Isiah Thomas who was a complete nightmare with respect to winning ballgames?

Let’s review your takeaways from this letter: don’t talk about your feelings.

More on Willie’s tenure here.

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